You need to test, we're here to help.

You need to test, we're here to help.

26 April 2016

The Evolving User Interface: Add New

Dragging a channel, memory, math, or zoom trace to the Add New box creates a new trace of the same type
Figure 1: Dragging a channel, memory, math, or zoom trace
to the Add New box creates a new trace of the same type
In our ongoing exploration of the evolving user interface as embodied by Teledyne LeCroy's MAUI - Most Advanced User Interface, we've seen how the addition of OneTouch gesture control and features such as Copy Setup and Change Source have made the touchscreen UI even more powerful, flexible, and intuitive. These features let you get the most out of an oscilloscope's functionality at lightning speed without fussing with menus or dialogs.

18 April 2016

The Evolving User Interface: Changing Sources

Changing the source of a trace is as simple as a drag-and-drop of the desired source's descriptor box onto the target descriptor box
Figure 1: Changing the source of a trace is as simple as
a drag-and-drop of the desired source's descriptor box onto
the target descriptor box
A truly modern oscilloscope user interface should lend itself to free-form experimentation in the interest of design and debug. Impulses to "try something" are at the core of creativity; you never want your test bench to stifle them. It should stay out of your way and not force you to stop and think about how to interact with the oscilloscope to make "something" happen. That's what Teledyne LeCroy has achieved by augmenting its MAUI - Most Advanced User Interface with OneTouch gesture control, a set of drag-and-drop actions that bring even more intuitiveness and flexibility to oscilloscopes' touchscreens (we covered another feature, Copy Setup, in an earlier post).

05 April 2016

The Evolving Oscilloscope User Interface

MAUI is Teledyne LeCroy's intuitive touch-based user interface
Figure 1: MAUI is Teledyne LeCroy's
intuitive touch-based user interface
The means of interaction with test equipment has steadily evolved and improved over the years. Concepts such as remote control, for instance, broadened the possibilities for users of oscilloscopes and other equipment. Advancing display technology brought helpful elements such as color coding of traces, while more powerful graphics processing and computing gave us multiple grids, and so on.

17 March 2016

The Challenges of GFCI Measurements

An example of a GFCI
Figure 1: An example
of a GFCI
The ubiquitous ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI), a fast-acting circuit breaker, has saved countless individuals from serious injury or death when they've inadvertently entered the low-resistance ground path of an electrical device or outlet. It's important to measure precisely the amount of time that elapses from when the 60-Hz cycle is present to when the GFCI disables the ground path. Other tests include determining the start, stop, and duration of the GFCI's tripping time. Let's take a look at the challenges these measurements present.

04 March 2016

Performance Considerations For Optical Modulation Analysis

Error-vector magnitude defined
Figure 1: Error-vector magnitude defined
In recent posts, we've covered the fundamentals of coherent signals and the basics of optical modulation analyzers. Let's now turn to the operational parameters of OMAs, in particular system bandwidth, and how that figure of merit in an OMA can determine how far your measurement system can take you in terms of meaningful analysis.

01 March 2016

What Is An Optical Modulation Analyzer?

A representative block diagram of a coherent transmitter and receiver
Figure 1: A representative block diagram of a coherent
transmitter and receiver
In an earlier post, we looked at some of the fundamentals of coherent signals: what comprises a coherent signal, how and why they're used, and a bit about how they're represented visually on an oscilloscope. The advent of coherent signals has brought about the rise of a new class of test instrumentation, known as an optical modulation analyzer (OMA). In this post, we'll examine what an OMA is and what it brings to the party above and beyond a stand-alone oscilloscope.

18 February 2016

The Fundamentals of Coherent Signals

These two coherent lightwaves have a constant phase offset
Figure 1: These two coherent light waves have
a constant phase offset
Optical communications have come a long way from the simple direct detection of amplitude-modulated transmissions. Today's long-haul optical networks make use of coherent detection, and for good reason. Using coherent detection, receivers can track the phase of the incoming signal and thereby extract any information conveyed using phase and/or frequency modulation. Thus, coherent detection facilitates much higher capacity without using more bandwidth.