You need to test, we're here to help.

You need to test, we're here to help.

25 September 2013

Back to Basics: What is an FFT?

An FFT of a 300-kHz square wave.
Figure 1: An FFT of a 300-kHz square wave.
In an earlier post, we discussed the basics of setting up a fast-Fourier transform (FFT) on an oscilloscope, and why you'd want to use an FFT to get a frequency-domain view of a time-domain signal in the first place. It might be a good idea to take a step back and dig into just what an FFT is (Figure 1).

19 September 2013

Back to Basics: Creating Pulsed Waveforms

The WaveStation 2000's Pulse waveform dialog box.
Figure 1: The WaveStation 2000's Pulse
waveform dialog box.
Many test applications call for the creation of pulsed waveforms ranging from clock signals to logic control to trigger signals, among others. Often, these waveforms are used in the characterization and debug of digital devices and circuits. Stand-alone pulse generators provide one way to generate pulsed waveforms but in many cases, a general-purpose waveform generator will do a fine job.

10 September 2013

Don't Just Trigger, But Trigger Smart

The runt pulse and non-monotonic edge anomalies in this signal are not apparent with a simple edge trigger.
Figure 1: The runt pulse and non-monotonic edge anomalies
in this signal are not apparent with a simple edge trigger.
In an earlier post, we looked at some of the basics of oscilloscope triggering and noted that there are two broad classes of triggers: simple triggers that sense particular characteristics of the input signal (transition edges, pulse widths, and so on), and more complex triggers that let you zero in on more specific attributes of the signal based on timing and amplitude parameters.